The Debut of Solar Impulse a Solar Powered Plane!

,Best Technology,Aerial view,zero emission,Sustainable,sustainability,leading edge,green,environmental design,environmental issues,environmentally friendly,energy effecient lighting,Energy Consumption,eco-conscious,eco travel,Globally Gorgeous,green design,sustainable design materials,State of the Art,Maienza-Wilson” href=”http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xdtvkuj3Jaw/S7zHFXZ0daI/AAAAAAAACYI/ji-DwyRonPo/s1600/Solar-Impulse-First-Flight_APPhoto_Laurent-Gillieron-5.jpg” imageanchor=”1″ style=”clear: left; float: left; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-right: 1em;”>

“In a world depending on fossil energies, the Solar Impulse project is a paradox, almost a provocation: it aims to have an airplane take off and fly autonomously, day and night, propelled uniquely by solar energy, right round the world without fuel or pollution. An unachievable goal without pushing back the current technological limits in all fields…” 

Everything went perfectly as the Solar Impulse made it debut in the clouds this morning after seven years of hard work and planning.  The solar-powered plane powered by 12,000 solar cells flew for 87 minutes at an altitude of over 4,000 feet. It performed test maneuvers, taking off and landing.  The Solar Impulse is made out of carbon fiber concentrate
and looks
like a glider with a wingspan of 60 meters and is the largest and lightest plane ever to take flight.  
solar airplane,solar impulse,bertrand piccard,flight pioneer,carbon fiber plane,solar energy powered,solar cell plane,flight technology,flying,airplanes,geneva lunch,inhabitat,Best Technology,Aerial view,zero emission,Sustainable,sustainability,leading edge,green,environmental design,environmental issues,environmentally friendly,energy effecient lighting,Energy Consumption,eco-conscious,eco travel,Globally Gorgeous,green design,sustainable design materials,State of the Art,Maienza-Wilson
Swiss psychiatrist, Bertrand Piccard (below) was the first
aeronaut to do a non
stop flight around the world in a balloon.  He will soon be attempting
the non stop flight around the world in a solar powered plane he helped
design with co-founder Andre Borschberg, fighter pilot, engineer and
graduate in management science.

“This first mission was the most risky phase of the entire project,” Piccard said.  “Eighty-seven minutes of intense emotion after seven years of research, testing and perseverance. Never has an airplane as large and light ever flown before!”
solar airplane,solar impulse,bertrand piccard,flight pioneer,carbon fiber plane,solar energy powered,solar cell plane,flight technology,flying,airplanes,geneva lunch,inhabitat,Best Technology,Aerial view,zero emission,Sustainable,sustainability,leading edge,green,environmental design,environmental issues,environmentally friendly,energy effecient lighting,Energy Consumption,eco-conscious,eco travel,Globally Gorgeous,green design,sustainable design materials,State of the Art,Maienza-Wilson
Here is what test pilot Marcus Scherdel had to say about
the test flight in an interview
with Martin Reichlin
Markus, you just completed the very first flight with the Solar Impulse. I suspect you feel like an Olympic champion now?
Well, I never was an Olympic champions yet. But I think the feeling is quite similar.

Could you enjoy this feeling already during the flight?
The first 20 minutes I had very little time for anything else than to do my job. After that I had gained enough altitude to have a look out of the window during my first turns and to enjoy the amazing panorama of the Alps.

Speaking of looking out the window: You were piloting something like an “aeronautic convertible” today as you had no shell around the cockpit. Wasn’t it pretty cold up there?

Not at all. I was wearing my special underwear and a windproof overall. In addition to that I got shoes and gloves with built-in heating. You see, we thought of everything.

But what about insects hitting your face as you had no windshield?
There were none. It’s still too cold for flies.

Probably the most critical part of the flight was the landing. Was it difficult for you?

Actually no. At that time I had already learned a lot about the plane and knew everything about its behavior I needed to know.

And how did it behave?
So far it was very well-tempered. But I have to say that today we were flying very slow – at one point the ground speed had dropped to 12 knots per hour (22 km/h) – and we never intended test the critical parameters of the plane. This will be one of the goals in the upcoming flights.


If you feel passionate about the program, join the challenge and experience it from the inside. Become an Angel Ambassador or Adviser.
See Also: The Cool Website for Solar Impuse
See Also: EAA website

An Eco Luxury, Net Zero & LEED Platinum Home Under Construction in Montecito, CA

Here is an update on the Eco Luxury House we are building at Butterfly Beach in Montecito, Ca. We collaborated with our friend and colleague Michelle Kaufman on the design of this home. Early on in the process we had intended this house to be a modular or prefab home because at that time we had the belief that this was the most proactive way for us to be as green as possible utilizing Michelle’s five eco principles . This was not necessarily the case, and in the end we are actually building a custom home built on site that is as green or greener than our original prefab plan. In fact we are right on track to be the first LEED For Homes PLATINUM CERTIFIED home in Montecito and also hope to achieve and annual Net Zero Energy Equalibrium.  I know that Michelle is thrilled that we are determined to figure out how to make the most sustainable project as is possible now. It is the positive result of what turned into a somewhat unfortunate experience.
There is a sad tale with a happy ending that took us in our current direction. As many people know Michelle Kaufmann’s company MKD Homes Closed it’s doors in June of 2009.  We were slated to begin the prefabrication process of the original design for this house just as the factory and Michelle Kaufmann closed theirs doors. This was a terrible consequence of the poor economy last year. After we stopped reeling from this unfortunate news, we reorganized our process (at a cost of 4 months and substantial redesign expenditures) and became even more determined to build a sustainable home. In the end, we are building a very high end, high quality, custom, sustainable home. We are happy that Michelle reorganized is practicing architecture and design is still a champion of sustainable and even eco luxury design. Here’s the new Michelle Kaufmann Studio.  Also, MKD Homes are now offered by  MKdesigns by blu homes which we think is fantastic that all of Michelle’s intellectual collateral will continue on.  We wish Michelle and blu homes smooth sailing ahead!

Here’s a Link to Our “Net Zero’ Post
Here’s a Link to Michelle Kaufmann’s Blog Post aout this Eco Luxury House
See Also The New York Time: The Rise of ‘Green’ Modular Homes by Francesca Lyman

Easter Brunch Try a Little Bunny Food with Eggs: Baked Eggs with Spinach

This recipe….is one of those easy but sophisticated ones that can serve as a late morning breakfast, or brunch staple….baked eggs and spinach.

First, you blanch some spinach, dropping in boiling water for 30 seconds to a minute, and then lining a lightly greased oven safe bowl with about a half a cup of the spinach.

Break two eggs over the top of the spinach, and pop in the oven at 375 degrees (200 C) +/-, for about 15-20 minutes, or until the eggs are cooked to your liking.

The result is an almost quiche like consistency, that is tasty and there are no carbs…..it is also something that can be served at a table in the garden or at the kitchen counter, where traditional egg dishes can get cold quickly or are impractical….really simple and simply delicious!  Thanks again to Donna Hay!

“WATER:OUR THIRSTY WORLD” PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT

“WATER: OUR THIRSTY WORLD” …An Exhibit at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Association with National Geographic Magazine opened Saturday, March 27, 2010.  This exhibition coincides with the release of National Geographic’s April 2010 issue on the precarious state of the world’s fresh water.  The exhibition will run through June 13, 2010 and examines the local and global challenges of our planet’s fresh water resources captured by a selection of National Geographic’s finest, award-winning photographers. The digital and print images will highlight the significance of fresh water in our lives and how the diminishment of this precious resource is impacting local and worldwide communities. A digital film presentation will expand the visitor experience by offering hundreds more National Geographic images and shared insights from photographers.

water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Jonas Bendiksen, Magnum Photos
India, 2009
In a parched Delhi slum, men swarm a tanker to siphon precious water. “If you throw money here,” says a local 16-year-old named Vinay, “no one would have time to grab it. Water is more important for us.”
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Amit Dave, Reuters
India, 2003
Parched Indian villagers mob a vast well in Natwargadh, Gujarat. In this drought-prone western state, yearly monsoon rains can total less than eight inches, and summer temperatures have topped 115°F.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Thomas Havisham, Panos
Angola, 2005
Peddling clean well water for 10 cents a bag, this seller will have no problem finding a buyer in a slum in Luanda, Angola. In 2006 the prevalence of contaminated water in the city led to one of Africa’s worst cholera epidemics, with 80,000 Angolans sickened.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Hans Strand, Freelance
Iceland, 2006
Swirling seaward, branches of the bountiful Kolgrima River inscribe the flatlands near Vatnajökull, Iceland’s largest glacier. Milky tones in the water are from pale silt; the blue is the reflection of the sky.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
John Stanmeyer, VII
India, 2009
India’s holiest river, the Ganges, is scribbled with light from floating oil lamps during the Ganga Dussehra festival in Haridwar. Hindus near death often bathe in the river; some are later cremated beside it and have their ashes scattered in its depths.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Edward Burtynsky
California, USA, 2009
Grass is not an option in Salton City, which survives on water imported from the Colorado River. With 20 million more residents expected in California by 2050, the state’s quest for water is never over.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Edward Burtynsky
California, USA, 2009
Once the city’s main water source, the Los Angeles River is now a concrete channel fed by storm drains. City residents rely on water pumped from hundreds of miles away.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
John Stanmeyer, VII
Laos, 2009
A woman launches an offering on the Mekong River, known to Laotians as the “mother of waters.” The occasion is Boun Pi Mai Lao, the New Year’s celebration, in April.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Ethiopia 2009
In pursuit of water, the girl with the green ladle routinely walks three hours to and from her Ethiopian village of Foro. Females here spend most of their lives fetching water; boys are exempted from the job when they turn seven or eight. 
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine
Ethiopia, 2009
To this end, NGOs are working to bring clean water to forgotten places, using technology—like a sand dam to capture rainwater in Ethiopia, where some women must wrest drops from muddy seeps —while ensuring that locals are involved in designing, building, and maintaining water projects.” 
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Kitra Cahana, National Geographic Magazine
Nevada, USA, 2009
Shaped like a water drop, this 17-foot-tall steel “meditation space” was made by Kate Raudenbush for Nevada’s annual Burning Man event. Her goal is “to bring awareness to the element of water on our planet and its vital importance to our evolutionary balance.”
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine
Ethiopia, 2009
In the Foro district of Ethiopia, rocks cover a family latrine, and a stick acts as a handle. Surveys show that the hygiene-education efforts of WaterAid, an NGO, are working here: Latrine use has risen from 6 to 25 percent since December 2007.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine
Ethiopia, 2009
Installed by the NGO WaterAid, makeshift wash stations like this one—a water bottle fastened to the exterior of a grass hut, with soap nearby—are appearing in Ethiopian villages, where lack of sanitation can be as dire a problem as water scarcity.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Gerd Ludwig, National Geographic Magazine
California, USA, 2009
In 2007, high levels of bromate—a carcinogen formed when bromide and chlorine react with sunlight—were found in Los Angeles’s seven-acre, 58-million-gallon Ivanhoe Reservoir. Today, three million black plastic balls help deflect UV rays.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine
Ethiopia, 2009
In Shekana, Ethiopia, Halike Berisha must fill her jug from a contaminated reservoir. Access to clean water is not solely a rural problem, but the challenges of delivering it are most daunting in remote places. 
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Theo Allofs, Corbis
Australia, 2006
Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.
water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson,Art. Annenberg, fresh water, Globally Gorgeous, Maienza-Wilson, National Geographic, photography, Water Sustainability
Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine
Kenya 2009
Tribal Gabra women in northern Kenya may need five hours a day to lug jerry cans laden with murky water across the desert. A lingering drought has pushed this already arid region to a full-blown water crisis.
The Annenberg Space for Photography is an entirely new cultural destination dedicated to exhibiting compelling photography. The Space conveys a range of human experiences and serves as an expression of the philanthropic work of the Annenberg Foundation and its Trustees. The intimate environment features state-of-the-art, high-definition digital technology as well as traditional prints by some of the world’s most renowned and emerging photographers. The exhibits change three times a year, however the common thread throughout is one of rich emotion. The Photography Space informs and inspires the public by connecting photographers, philanthropy and the human experience through powerful imagery and stories. It is the first solely photographic cultural destination in the Los Angeles area.

“WATER:OUR THIRSTY WORLD” PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT

WATER: OUR THIRSTY WORLD” …An Exhibit at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Association with National Geographic Magazine opened Saturday, March 27, 2010.  This exhibition coincides with the release of National Geographic’s April 2010 issue on the precarious state of the world’s fresh water.  The exhibition will run through June 13, 2010 and examines the local and global challenges of our planet’s fresh water resources captured by a selection of National Geographic’s finest, award-winning photographers. The digital and print images will highlight the significance of fresh water in our lives and how the diminishment of this precious resource is impacting local and worldwide communities. A digital film presentation will expand the visitor experience by offering hundreds more National Geographic images and shared insights from photographers.

Jonas Bendiksen, Magnum Photos








India, 2009
In a parched Delhi slum, men swarm a tanker to siphon precious water. “If you
throw money here,” says a local 16-year-old named Vinay, “no one would have
time to grab it. Water is more important for us.”

Amit Dave, Reuters
India, 2003
Parched Indian villagers mob a vast well in Natwargadh, Gujarat. In this
drought-prone western state, yearly monsoon rains can total less than eight
inches, and summer temperatures have topped 115°F.

Thomas Havisham, Panos








Angola, 2005








Peddling clean well water for 10 cents a bag, this seller will have no problem
finding a buyer in a slum in Luanda, Angola. In 2006 the prevalence of
contaminated water in the city led to one of Africa’s worst cholera epidemics,
with 80,000 Angolans sickened.

Hans Strand, Freelance








Iceland, 2006








Swirling seaward, branches of the bountiful Kolgrima River inscribe the
flatlands near Vatnajökull, Iceland’s largest glacier. Milky tones in the water
are from pale silt; the blue is the reflection of the sky.

water blessing, conservation, national geographic, sacred water, john stanmeyer, joel sartore, silent streams, paolo pellegrin lynn johnson edward burtynsky, jonas bendiksen, the annenberg apace for photography, art, photography, globally gorgeous, maienza wilson
John Stanmeyer, VII








India, 2009








India’s holiest river, the Ganges, is scribbled with light from floating oil
lamps during the Ganga Dussehra festival in Haridwar. Hindus near death often
bathe in the river; some are later cremated beside it and have their ashes
scattered in its depths.

Edward Burtynsky








California, USA, 2009








Grass is not an option in Salton City, which survives on water imported from
the Colorado River. With 20 million more residents expected in California by
2050, the state’s quest for water is never over.

Edward Burtynsky
California, USA, 2009

Once the city’s main water source, the Los Angeles River is now a concrete
channel fed by storm drains. City residents rely on water pumped from hundreds
of miles away.























John Stanmeyer, VII






Laos, 2009
A woman launches an offering on the Mekong River, known to Laotians as the
“mother of waters.” The occasion is Boun Pi Mai Lao, the New Year’s
celebration, in April.







Ethiopia 2009
In pursuit of water, the girl with the green ladle routinely walks three hours
to and from her Ethiopian village of Foro. Females here spend most of their
lives fetching water; boys are exempted from the job when they turn seven or
eight. 

























Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine






Ethiopia, 2009
To this end, NGOs are working to bring clean water to forgotten places, using
technology—like a sand dam to capture rainwater in Ethiopia, where some women
must wrest drops from muddy seeps —while ensuring that locals are involved in
designing, building, and maintaining water projects.” 

























Kitra Cahana, National Geographic Magazine






Nevada, USA, 2009
Shaped like a water drop, this 17-foot-tall steel “meditation space” was made
by Kate Raudenbush for Nevada’s annual Burning Man event. Her goal is “to bring
awareness to the element of water on our planet and its vital importance to our
evolutionary balance.”
























Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine






Ethiopia, 2009
In the Foro district of Ethiopia, rocks cover a family latrine, and a stick
acts as a handle. Surveys show that the hygiene-education efforts of WaterAid,
an NGO, are working here: Latrine use has risen from 6 to 25 percent since
December 2007.

























Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine






Ethiopia, 2009
Installed by the NGO WaterAid, makeshift wash stations like this one—a water
bottle fastened to the exterior of a grass hut, with soap nearby—are appearing
in Ethiopian villages, where lack of sanitation can be as dire a problem as
water scarcity.

























Gerd Ludwig, National Geographic Magazine






California, USA, 2009
In 2007, high levels of bromate—a carcinogen formed when bromide and chlorine
react with sunlight—were found in Los Angeles’s seven-acre, 58-million-gallon
Ivanhoe Reservoir. Today, three million black plastic balls help deflect UV
rays.































Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine






Ethiopia, 2009
In Shekana, Ethiopia, Halike Berisha must fill her jug from a contaminated
reservoir. Access to clean water is not solely a rural problem, but the
challenges of delivering it are most daunting in remote places. 







Theo Allofs, Corbis
Australia, 2006
Brown with sediment loosed by seasonal rains, Australia’s King River snakes
through the coastal mudflats of the Kimberley, a remote northwestern region. In
the dry months of May to September, the 76-mile meander lies bare.








Lynn Johnson, National Geographic Magazine
Kenya 2009
Tribal Gabra women in northern Kenya may need five hours a day to lug jerry
cans laden with murky water across the desert. A lingering drought has pushed
this already arid region to a full-blown water crisis. 



About the Annenberg Space for Photography
The Annenberg Space for Photography is an entirely new cultural destination dedicated to exhibiting compelling photography. The Space conveys a range of human experiences and serves as an expression of the philanthropic work of the Annenberg Foundation and its Trustees. The intimate environment features state-of-the-art, high-definition digital technology as well as traditional prints by some of the world’s most renowned and emerging photographers. The exhibits change three times a year, however the common thread throughout is one of rich emotion. The Photography Space informs and inspires the public by connecting photographers, philanthropy and the human experience through powerful imagery and stories. It is the first solely photographic cultural destination in the Los Angeles area.

Organic Cooking: Gregg’s Wild Caught Alaskan Halibut with Mango Salsa and Sweet Potato Fries: Thanks to Donna Hay!

A Great Recipe with the Seasons first succulent wild caught Alaskan Halibut and organic sides of Sweet Potato Fries and Haricot Verts.
These thick cut Baked Fries made from Organically Grown Sweet Potatoes are healthy alternative to traditional fries. Simply peel, cut into 1/4″ thick lengthwise pieces. Lightly brush cut potatoes with a combination of  sesame oil and vegetable oil, Salt with Sea Salt and bake until golden at 425 degrees.





Prepare the Mango Salsa with One Mango, minced, 3/4 cup minced cucumber, 3 Tablespoons minced Cilantro and 1/2 cup minced red onion, with a dash of fresh lime juice added at the end.  You can make this preparation in advance and refrigerate.

Fresh Halibut often comes with a layer of skin on it, so trim it off so the fish is clean, and the filets look uniform.  Then wrap the filets in a pre-soaked Cedar paper, which you can often find by the fish section at the grocer or fish market.   Place on a hot grill for 3-4 minutes, flip and cook the other side for the same amount of time or until the fish is flaking.   You can also use foil, but the point is to basically poach the fish.


Here is the finished product.  You can find out many more delicious grilling recipes at Fire and Flavor.

Dessert can be a simple puff pastry tart, which is so easy and so tasty!  get frozen puff pastry sheets in the frozen section of the grocer, pink lady apples or pears from the produce section….cut the pastry sheets in half and line with thinly sliced cored apples or pears, like above.  Dust with a tablespoon of brown sugar…Use a non-stick spray on a cookie sheet, Pop in the oven at 425 for 9-12 minutes or till golden brown.  Pull out of the oven, remove immediately to a cooling rack or serving tray otherwise they will stick to the cookie sheet.  Serve each tart in thirds, with a Tahitian Vanilla Bean ice cream…this is so good!!!  You have got to love Donna Hay!

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