Honolulu Hideaway….found

One of my jobs as a summer employee at Maienza+Wilson is to organize their media assets library. I’ve been given “carte blanche” to post whatever I find relevant and interesting within MW archives and connect it with their current work. A fresh perspective, linking past and present projects. I found their “Honolulu Hideaway” in Architectural Digest!

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Photos: Durston Saylor for Architectural Digest


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Photos: Durston Saylor for Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest’s article on this project in its September 2005 issue gives a brief history of the origins of the project: “after spending years vacationing in Hawaii, John Maienza and Gregg Wilson set out to find, and transform if need be, a house of their own. The pair agreed to hold out until they found a house that had integrity, authenticity, history, and (ideally) some style.”


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Photos: Durston Saylor for Architectural Digest

The house they found had all the qualities they sought after, minus the clumsy additions it had acquired over the years which only slightly marred its historic authenticity. Built in 1933, the house had age, which made it a sort of cultural antiquity, and perfectly expressed the “local vernacular, which might be summed up as a colonial plantation meets world traveler.”

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Photos: Durston Saylor for Architectural Digest

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Photos: Durston Saylor for Architectural Digest

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In addition to restoring the house to its cultural roots, they also brought the house up to modern building codes, and renovated the interior to seamlessly blend the older style with a lush palette. The decorations included paintings by local resident, artist Daryl Millard, and Hawaiian-born artist Irving Jenkins. Architectural Digest explains that “they developed the interior design with two principles in mind: One was to keep the rooms as connected to the lush garden as possible, and the other was to root them firmly in Hawaiian associations.”

John and Gregg want to thank Architectural Digest for this wonderful article and encourage everyone to Subscribe to the Magazine.

See full Article on MW website

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